DOIs for Research Data and RDM Training Materials

ADMIRe induction and #gettingtogrips

I will be starting full-time with ADMIRe next week, so this month has mainly been taken up with ADMIReĀ  induction meetings, project planning with Tom and Bill, allocating tasks from the work packages, preparing presentations, and desk-based research on research data management (RDM) and data information literacy (DIL).

Research Data Management Training Materials

I have been looking at a very wide range of topics/issues related to research data management and have found the outputs from the JISC Research data management training materials (RDMTrain) projects particularly useful. Tomorrow, Tom and I will be joining Wendy (Faculty Team Leader, Medicine and Health Sciences) and colleagues from the Graduate School to explore the potential of the Research Data MANTRA course . This course is designed for PhD students and others who are planning a research project using digital data.

MANTRA is an Open Educational Resource (OER) that may be freely used by anyone. It is available through an open license for re-using, rebranding, and re-purposing. MANTRA is one of the key outputs from the first phase of the JISCMRD programme and has been produced by EDINA and Data Library, a division of Information Services, University of Edinburgh. Further information on the project is available from here.

Today I did a presentation for the Information Literacy Development Group (ILDG) on the issue of RDM and data information literacy skills (DIL). For some useful information on the role of data information literacy and libraries, the presentations from the recent Research Libraries UK (RLUK) eventĀ  are all available here. This event aimed to clarify the research library agenda with regard to RDM.

DOIs for Research Data

I came across this interesting article today (full-text freely available), published in the May/June 2012 issue of the D-Lib Magazine:

Implementing DOIs for Research Data‘, Natasha Simons, Griffith University, Australia. Natasha concludes that implementing DOIs has “raised governance questions common to other institutions that encouraged discussion and collaboration.”