Data citation, sharing data, and RDM at Nottingham

It has been a pretty hectic couple of weeks for Tom and I filled with meetings with key University of Nottingham staff from different departments and divisions all whom are keen to facilitate and deliver good and effective research data management (RDM) practice at our institution. We have identified and contacted academics from all five faculties (Arts, Engineering, Medicine and Health Sciences, Science, and Social Sciences) to take part in our phase one RDM pilots and we have also given plenty of thought to what we would like the University of Nottingham RDM website to contain and offer our research community. We are also working on a RDM@Nottingham survey which we hope will inform the development of the ADMIRe project.

Since my last blog post I have also attended some interesting external events including the excellent DataCite workshop at the British Library which covered topics such as how to mint a DOI (Digital Object Identifier), why making research data available and citable is important, and the challenges there are with citing research data. All the presentations from the day are available here.

I also attended the Repositories Support Project one day event on scholarly communications and new developments in open access in London on the 01st June. It was held at the stunning Art Deco venue the Royal Institute of British Architects (RIBA) and the programme showcased some great case examples of innovative approaches supporting data sharing, open access to research outputs and an open approach to scholarship.  Videos and presentations from the event are all available here.

Ethics, consent and data sharing – for anyone interested in this area of RDM I would definitely recommend listening to the recording of the Webinar delivered by Margaret Henty of the Australian National Data Service in April. She considers the myths around data sharing, meeting funding bodies obligations, informed consent, access control, and the importance of incorporating data sharing into research planning.

Also published this week is the Council on Library and Information Resources publication “How does big data change the research landscape for the humanities and social sciences?”. The full-text publication and associated press release is available here.